Posts Categorized: Recipient

Waldron Project

Waldron Grazing Co-Operative Ltd.

Located in Alberta’s Southern Foothills, the Waldron Property is the largest remaining block of deeded land along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, and last year, the Waldron Grazing Co-operative Ltd. made Canadian conservation history by voting in favour of working with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to place a conservation easement on the 30,536-acre Waldron Property. This agreement is the largest conservation easement in both Canadian and ...

Rough Fescue Grasslands Restoration Project

Tannas Conservation Services

Foothills rough fescue (Festuca campestris) is the climax grassland species of the grasslands stretching along the foothills in south- Through research on the mechanisms behind Kentucky bluegrass invasion and methods to restore rough fescue, Steven Tannas and the team at Tannas Conservation Services, has been able to create a reclamation technique that has resulted in the repeated successful restoration of foothills rough fescue in multiple reclamation projects of the ...

Statoil Understanding Caribou Initiatives

Statoil Canada

Statoil is demonstrating that a healthy environment and economy is attainable by using science to develop methods that can protect caribou in Alberta’s oil sands. Not only is Statoil learning more about Caribou through their innovative methods to conserve their habitat, but they are also sharing their knowledge to help to understand and conserve the environment by understanding caribou.  As one judge stated, “This is really cool work that ...

Solar Energy Society of Alberta

Alberta has an excellent solar resource and the Solar Energy Society of Alberta has created unique programs to help residents take advantage of it.  They strive to deliver the best solar education programs to usher in a clean energy future in Alberta.

The Miistakis Institute

The Miistakis Institute not only provides data to decision makers, but also provides comprehensive context and knowledge around important environmental and land development issues.  Miistakis takes academic knowledge and makes it available for practical use in the Alberta environmental field.

Children’s Summer Camp

Camp Maskepetoon

The judges loved that “The most innovated thing about Camp Maksepetoon is that it hasn’t changed in 58 years.”  It promotes a natural, back-to-nature approach to camping and gives campers the opportunity to escape from city life, slow down, enjoy time outdoors, hike, take canoe lessons, swim in the lake, take part in nature journaling, enjoy unscheduled forest time, and engage with the environment constantly in a variety of ...

Waste In Residence Program

Office of Sustainability, University of Alberta

UAlberta has a long tradition of providing recycling services going back to the 1970’s, long before the practise was mainstream. Recently they have refocused on enhancing the student experience in residences related to waste and since 2010, has diverted 11,600 of waste beyond their traditional recycling streams. This has been accomplished through commitment, shared responsibility, collaboration, and excellence.

Algar Restoration Pilot Project

Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA)

This project represents a collaboration between six oil sands companies, the province of Alberta and the local forestry industry and is actively restoring important caribou habitat.  COSIA recognizes the importance of maintaining biodiversity while responsibly developing oil sands assets.   One judge said “COSIA has stepped in where there hadn’t been any action before.”

Southern Rockies Watershed Project

Southern Rockies Watershed Project Team

The Southern Rockies Watershed Project is in its 10th year of watershed research and monitoring and focuses on climate, hydrology and stream ecosystem health.  Their research activities span 80 square kilometres and nine watersheds and represent the largest and longest running forest hydrology research projects in Alberta.  One judge said “to keep this going for ten years is remarkable.”